Home Signalling and Telecoms Rail debut for Eric Wright

Rail debut for Eric Wright

Eric Wright Civil Engineering has completed a re-signalling project on the Settle and Carlisle line further underscoring the rail industry’s bounce-back from the Beeching Report, 50 years ago.

Once slated for closure the Settle and Carlisle now carries a burgeoning payload of passenger and freight trains and is an essential part of Anglo-Scottish rail links. Appointed by Network Rail, the Preston-based firm designed and installed new signalling infrastructure for Howe and Co in a welcome move aimed at further improving efficiency on the Settle- Carlisle line.

Acknowledging the firm’s rail debut, director of Eric Wright Civil Engineering, Adrian Taylor, said, ‘This is one of our first contracts with the rail sector and is an area where we hope to establish ongoing relationships.

‘We worked closely with Network Rail at Howe and Co to successfully complete the track signalling with minimal disruption to the public. We are pleased with the finished works and hope that this is just the first of many rail projects ahead.’

The work, which took three weeks to complete, was undertaken mostly at weekends to avoid disruption for local passengers. Working under tight deadlines, Eric Wright Civil Engineering successfully removed existing signals and installed new and improved signalling systems.

The firm has a growing portfolio of work on complex civil engineering projects and a wealth of experience both in the public and private sector. Other rail projects underway include an improvement project at Northallerton.

Hard working staff from Eric Wright Civil Engineering are busy installing a CCTV system, perimeter fence, ticket machines, lighting and drainage. The car park is being extended. Northallerton is a busy station served by East Coast, FTPE and Grand Central. The nearby Wensleydale Railway, which operates on the old Redmire Quarry line, plans to reconnect to the station.

Founded in 1923, the Eric Wright Group is based at Bamber Bridge, near Preston, and employs more than 500 people. In a bid to attract young people to engineering Eric Wright runs, owns and operates an outdoor adventure centre in Cumbria, Lakeland Adventure Centre, and a vocational learning centre in Leyland called the Eric Wright Learning Foundation.

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