Home Heritage First-ever second generation EMU painted in original British Rail colours

First-ever second generation EMU painted in original British Rail colours

The country’s first-ever second generation electric multiple unit (EMU) has been painted in its original blue and grey British Rail livery.

Train 313201, which operates out of Govia Thameslink Railway’s (GTR) Brighton depot along the Coastway route, has been repainted in its original colours – except for changes to meet today’s accessibility requirements – by GTR and Beacon Rail.

The train was the first off the production line at British Rail Engineering Ltd’s York Works in 1976.


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Photo: GTR.
Photo: GTR.

It was BR’s first unit designed with both a pantograph for 25 kV AC overhead lines and shoegear for 750 V DC third rail supply.

Originally numbered 313001, it was reclassified 313201 when it was transferred along with 18 other units to Southern and the pantograph removed.

The repainting was carried out as part of a programme of improvement works, including work on the door mechanism, the air system, parts of the interiors plus repairs to the bodywork to keep them safe and fully functional.


Read more: Virgin Trains launches industry’s first train driver apprenticeship


 

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